Editorial License

Rob Hammerton, music educator etc.

It’s About Time

On teaching: … the job seems to require the sort of skills one would need to pilot a bus full of live chickens backwards, with no brakes, down a rocky road through the Andes while simultaneously providing colorful and informative commentary on the scenery.”

   — author Franklin Habit

 

So, he puts up this (relatively) (for him) massive website to broadcast the idea that he’s planning to ramp up his musical arranging efforts. Those efforts previously were just kind of an extra, something on-the-side that he did for fun and a couple of bucks here and there.

But why? My writing in recent years has been mostly for friends. I haven’t gone in for all that Advertising and Marketing Stuff. I haven’t done research on estimated tax payments. Why shift gears now?

Among the several perfectly good reasons, it occurred to me – and I’m talking mainly to the music teachers out there, the school ensemble directors, and possibly the church musicians as well – that there’s one reason which has gotten especially notable in the last year or so:

You probably don’t have a spare minute to do it yourself.

I’m lucky to know a pack of music teachers – friends and colleagues with whom I have shared tales before – who probably are capable of putting a note or two down on paper (virtual or otherwise) for their bands, jazz bands, orchestras, choruses, small groups, whatever. I can think of one such friend and colleague who just put an item together for her middle-school jazzers, and seemed quite thrilled with it.

But given all the Stuff (with a capital “S”) that teachers have to do as part of their daily jobs – and the extra Stuff that various education departments, federal, state and local, have piled on top of them – well, I can imagine many music teachers thinking, “I’d love to write out this or that tune for my gang; but with what time, exactly?”

New evaluation regimens. New requirements for record-keeping, with respect to those evaluation standards, and to special-education plans, and … well, the list goes on and on. Even if teachers were “merely” teaching, and didn’t have to contend with all the other Stuff that goes with teaching (in many cases, being the parents that their students maybe don’t have, or certainly could sorely use), preparation of materials and strategies for those classes still would put time at a premium. Not to mention, they might be trying to maintain lives outside the workplace. What a thought.

In the last year or two, here in Massachusetts, a new requirement was dropped onto teachers of all stripes (music included): they need to take a specialized course in how to deal with English-as-a-second-language learners, and there’s a deadline before which they have to take it. It’s the equivalent of a semester-long graduate class, with weekly writing assignments; and everyone must complete it, and get a good grade, … and pay for it themselves. No help from the state, or from any individual school districts. Oh joy. Another unfunded mandate.

Don’t get me started. Oops. Too late.

I have it on good authority that the humor in those classes is strictly gallows.

<*shakes himself from his red-tinged haze of “you gotta be kiddin’ me”*>

Having been a high school band (and chorus and jazz band) director, I know all too well the virtual mountain of to-do list items that face music teachers regularly. Sometimes it’s a physical mountain of Stuff.

My new favorite quote about that specific version of teaching comes from a t-shirt meme, of all things:

 

Being a band director is easy.

It’s like riding a bike.

Except the bike is on fire.

You’re on fire.

Everything is on fire.

 

With all that, who has the time to write out the perfect arrangement, not to mention the time it takes to track down copyright permissions information and all the rest of the details that go into all this?

You could say I want to help.

So do feel free to pass the word … if you (or a friend or a colleague) have a project in mind that you will never in a million years get to, but would make your kids very happy (with you!) … drop me a note here, or visit the shiny new website, HammertonMusic.com

and let me know what I can do to make your life easier.

 

[Ed. Note: this blog post was originally posted over on my “News ‘n’ Notes” blog at HammertonMusic.com.  Synergy!  Or something.]

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November 18, 2015 - Posted by | arranging, band, choir, education, HammertonMusic.com, marching band, music, teachers | , , , , , , , , ,

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