Editorial License

Rob Hammerton, music educator etc.

Contact

Please feel free to contact me via the comment option of this page…

which forces you to leave an eMail address of your own…

which I will delete after contacting you via regular eMail…

after which I’ll be happy to trade other forms of contact information.

It’s not that I don’t trust you.  I don’t trust all the spammers and other mean people in the world.

11 Comments »

  1. Robert, thank Heavens for your days of journalism @ UMASS! I of course have little memory of things from not only those days, but heck, yesterday. Bring in on and help us all to take a stroll down the memory lane of a very special year in the UMMB.

    Comment by Heidi | September 30, 2010 | Reply

  2. Hey! I think there is a typo on your resume. Yes, I was reading it

    The resume says that you graduated from UMass in 98 and I think it was 88 based on your bio.

    Thank you for your installments. I love them!!!

    Comment by Heather Felder | September 30, 2010 | Reply

  3. And you’re a “music educator ‘etc’,” Rob? What’s the “etc” for? Maybe, “egomanical, thoughtless, cretin.” Sure wouldn’t want my kids “educated” by a creep like you. What you’ve just done is demonstrate your total ignorance of musical talent, discredit yourself, devalued your credibility and alienate yourself with thousands of people.

    Comment by Bruce Henderson | June 27, 2011 | Reply

  4. Could not find an option to “edit” my previous comment on the “Zinger” topic, with apologies for an overly strong reaction.
    Please feel free to remove it if you choose.

    Comment by Steve C. | June 28, 2011 | Reply

  5. Thought I had successfully signed up to follow you musings but seem to have failed as I never get email updates. I do enjoy your thoughts muchly – please add – if you dare! :). Thanks Rob!

    Comment by Katie | January 18, 2012 | Reply

  6. Salve, discipule!
    I just came across your ‘Sententiae’ article by chance and was delighted to read it!! I always wonder how many students remember them. I always thought they were fun!
    Thank you for this marvelous memorial to our Latin classes!
    Magistra Lowe

    Comment by Shirley Lowe | March 12, 2013 | Reply

  7. Thanks Robert for your article. It appears to be a lot more balanced than the great majority of knee jerk reactionary articles mocking the movie and condemning and smearing the producers for whatever. Robert Sungenis, a devout traditional Catholic family man with 11 children (the last time I checked) is a very sincere individual who has learned the hard way not to accept all that science (often scientism) has forced down our throats. (Evolution’s frog to prince fairy tale at face value.is just one example.) He has paid and continues to pay a rather heavy price for that in terms of being calumniated to the nth degree with some of the most vile and hateful commentary imaginable. Robert is a courageous man with some strong (and I might add very well formed, not misinformed) convictions, however, unlike so much of the fickle super politically correct mainstream media which is anything, but free. That media as perhaps you well know traffics in a lot of innuendos and could usually care less if it destroys a man’s good name.

    I believe the movie The Principle will prove to be a most powerful and important movie. My goodness, just look at all the heat it is generating even before it is released. This movie will really challenge the status quo of science and a lot of smug beliefs held by a lot of people. No wonder it and its producers are being attacked so viciously in so many quarters!

    Thanks again for your article. It stands out as one with some good balance.

    Comment by James Phillips | April 11, 2014 | Reply

    • Mr. Phillips,

      First and foremost, thanks for your comment. (It means someone’s reading!!) Also, as a blog writer who has had to contend with the occasional fire-breathing commenter, I always appreciate a comment that has fewer exclamation points than sentences – regardless of whether I see eye-to-eye with its author.

      To be clear, this post was far less about geocentrism, and far more about the challenge of being a public figure and having people assume things about you based solely on the scripts you may lend your voice or image to, in order to make a living. Geocentrism was a frame story, really.

      To be clear in another direction, I’m by no means a geocentrist – but I see no reason to use incendiary prose to express that opinion. There’s already far too much of that on the Internet as it is. So at the very least, whether or not I’m interested in balance in terms of essay content, I’m always interested in balance in terms of tone.

      Thanks again.

      Comment by rhammerton1 | April 11, 2014 | Reply

  8. It will be a sad farewell. I had the opportunity to chat with Mr. Keillor last year and he led me to the moth resources. As a lover of the art of storytelling, I welcomed the chance to explore this as I assumed Mr. Keillors’ retirement would be here soon enough. I will miss him, but the moth participants may soften the pain ( I hope). I am very grateful to Mr. Keillor for sharing his gifts with us and for introducing us to folks like the extraordinary Rich Dworsky.

    Comment by John Castleman | July 25, 2015 | Reply

  9. Would you happen to know where I could possibly find “When You Wish Upon a Star” arranged by Kerchner or Higgins for marching band?

    Thank you!!
    Cindy

    Comment by Cindy | August 10, 2015 | Reply

    • My online archaeology suggests that the Kerchner arrangement (Arrangers Publishing Co.) is permanently out of print … the University of Rhode Island marching band’s online repertoire catalog includes a “Wish Upon” arrangement but doesn’t identify the arranger; you might contact them and see?
      Sounds like the tune might also have been published for marching band by the erstwhile (and legendary) Jenson Publications, which was bought out by Hal Leonard Corp. many years ago. Possibly an inquiry to HL might yield some results?
      [The Jenson arrangements of the late 70s/early 80s, which I listened to as a HS student via their promo records which I kinda “permanently borrowed” from my band director, were glorious in their utter disregard for normal HS trumpeters’ ranges. I loved them anyway. It’d be great to hear Higgins’ take on “Wish Upon”!!]
      Anyway, if I happen upon any better leads in my travels, I’ll follow up, again, via this comment thread. Thanks for the contact!

      Comment by rhammerton1 | August 10, 2015 | Reply


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