Editorial License

Rob Hammerton, music educator etc.

“The Crying Babies Doesn’t Look Good Politically”

A couple of weekends ago, as part of my church musician work, I helped wrangle a pack of Sunday School kids as they stood up at the front of the church sanctuary and sang a couple of songs they’d been working on. I smiled and sang along with them and encouraged them to try to remember the words. I was reminded, strongly, of my experience with teaching public-school music to packs of kindergarten kids nearly a decade ago. I got back up to speed really, really fast. I was reminded, strongly, of just what kind of backflips can go into working with kids that small … never mind teaching them; just helping them be comfortable in new situations, doing unfamiliar things, for the first time.

That Sunday, in church, there were kids as old as sixth grade, and as young as pre-school. Some of them walked to the front steps of the church; some of them toddled, led by Mom or Dad. Some of them stood straight and smiled. Some of them were inclined to wander off (so we gently guided them back to the steps). Some of them threw their heads back and sang lustily, just like the United Methodist Hymnal suggests; some of the kids mouthed the words a split-second after they heard the rest of the group sing them.

Some of them I’ve known all their lives; some of them I haven’t known very long at all. Some of them were from families who had come to our church pretty recently; some of them had been part of our church family for a very long time (relatively). Some of them looked totally at ease with standing up in front of the congregation and singing. Some of them looked more than a little bewildered, because they don’t often stand up in front of the congregation and have everybody lookin’ at ’em.

I remember being more than a little bewildered — pretty freaked out, really — the first time my mom delivered pre-school-age me to a Sunday School classroom in the church where our family were members, a building where I’d spent plenty of time, a building where I already recognized plenty of people. I was more than a little nervous that she was going away … even though she’d always picked me back up from whatever classroom she’d delivered me to, in my life to that point. Intellectually (at age 4?), I knew she always would. But in that moment, the parallel instinctive separation-anxiety wiring kicked right in, and I got really really freaked out.

This morning I tried to imagine myself taken away from my mom, and parked in a “tender age shelter”.

This morning I tried to imagine any of the kindergarten kids that I taught, or all of them, parked in a “tender age shelter”.

This morning I tried to imagine any of our Sunday School kids, or all of them, parked in a “tender age shelter”.

This morning I tried to imagine my niece and nephew, when they were toddlers, or infants, parked in a “tender age shelter”.

Oh, hell no.

My mind recoiled at the prospect.

Someone’s mind didn’t, though.

 

People in our government, working for our government, representing us by doing so … have acquired the kind of cognitive dissonance that allows them to not merely consider that prospect in the abstract and not retch, but to actually create and implement and enforce an immigration-control policy that takes toddlers and infants away from parents (who are seeking asylum from places that are dangerous enough that they want to remove their children to keep them safe) … and chucks ’em into a holding pen. (Or, as has been postulated by people who are putting one and one together and getting at least two, in the case of all the girls that no one can find, chucks ’em into an even worse place.)

There are monsters running our government.

There is only one remedy for this.

There are members of our elected government –- members of the United States Senate and House of Representatives –- who support this policy wholeheartedly. There are those who are remaining mealy-mouthed or dead-silent in the service of political expedience, political ideology, and political campaign contributions. In a meeting with the Congressional majority yesterday, the Short-Fingered Vulgarian who currently occupies the Oval Office reportedly declared, “The crying babies doesn’t look good politically.”

There are, astoundingly, plenty of elected officials who refuse to condemn taking babies from parents and parking them in “tender age shelters” — should we call them detention playpens? – no, we should cut the delicate-sensibility-preserving bull-pucky and call them baby jails, because that’s what they are …

We must identify them. Mark them. Tag them.

And vote the bastards out.

And thereby send a message to them and to anybody who supports them. Big sign in the window: “Congress inside. Only humans need apply.”

It’s long past time to stop “trying to understand” any of these people. Because there is no way for a compassionate person to understand this. The cognitive dissonance-fueled gap between “pro-life” and “pro-family”, “family values”, “What-Would-Jesus-Do?” … and THIS … is too vast to bridge.

 

It’s time to stop pulling punches. With respect to Mrs. Obama, who had the right idea … nonetheless it’s time to stop “going high when they go low”. If it isn’t time to take to the streets on this, it’s awfully damn close.

In November, remember this moment … even along with all the other moments, the Parklands and Pulses, the Pruitts and Princes, the “thoughts and prayers” and rage-Tweeting … remember this moment, when the Republican Congressional majority entirely failed to access some basic humanity and call this policy what it is: domestic terrorism.

In November, flood the polling places with so many people voting to rid our government of these conscience-less, soul-less ghouls that no amount of Putin-driven Russian bot farms and Kremlin election-machinery-hacking will remotely matter.

November.

Remember.

Remember the people who are okay with traumatizing infants and toddlers, who are okay with scarring them for life, on purpose.

Remember these domestic terrorists.

Remember these monsters.

And vanquish them.

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June 20, 2018 Posted by | civil rights, current events, government, news, politics | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Children in Cages

Children in cages?

In cages?

Not in playpens.

Not in cribs.

Not in rooms.

Children in cages.

High-school-aged children.

Middle-school-aged children.

Grade-school-aged kids.

Toddlers.

Toddlers and infants.

Infants in cages.

In cages.

 

Is anyone changing any of their dirty diapers?

Is anyone drying the tears that guaranteed are being shed?

Is anyone talking to them?

Is anyone feeding them?

While they’re in cages?

Children in cages.

If your state or local child-protection agencies find children in cages in your home, they take the children to somewhere safe, where they’ll be better cared for. And they’ll haul you in front of some magistrate or other authority who will hold you accountable.

Who’s coming to take the federal government employees and haul them in front of some kind of accountability?

Who are all those federal government employees, who didn’t invent the policy that takes children away from asylum-seeking migrants who themselves are awaiting immigration hearings and processing (which takes several weeks at least), but who are carrying it out anyway?

Who are all those federal government employees, who for whatever reason have decided to stay on the job anyway, even though their job is currently awful and inhuman?

(“I was just following orders” was proven, as recently as 75 years ago, to be not a valid reason. “I need to keep hold of this job so I can feed my family” is hardly a better reason, and might even be more hypocritical. Your family isn’t living in cages.)

Who are all the federal government people who crafted and created and instituted and ordered the policy to be carried out?

Who are these people who decided that it was okay to house children, some as young as two years old, in cages?

Children in cages.

In cages.

 

I’m going to suggest that “both sides” do not do this.

This is a policy that was invented after January 2017.

There are plenty of immigration control policies that were invented before that which deserve serious critique. ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) as a federal agency was invented after 9/11, with all the haste and desperately PR-driven inspiration that implies. There are plenty of immigration policies that were continued during the previous presidential administration, and yes, we would be justified in demanding to know why that was.

But this policy, the policy of separating children from their parents and putting them in cages, was created by the current administration*.

They’re putting children in cages. And leaving them there indefinitely. They’re effectively abandoning children. And they think that’s fine.

Why do they think that?

They think that, because the majority of those kids come from families that are poor, and are brown.

And poor and brown children aren’t as important, aren’t as worthy, aren’t as human as kids who aren’t poor or brown.

That’s what they think. That’s what that side thinks.

This is nothing that the current platform of the Congressional minority party lays out.

This is, rather, symbolic of nearly everything that the current platform of the Congressional majority party, and the party that currently controls the federal executive branch of government, supports.

Both sides don’t do this.

One side does this.

The side that is currently in power.

Ryan and McConnell, implicitly, do this.

Sessions, implicitly, does this.

Pence, implicitly, does this.

Trump, implicitly, does this.

Only one way to fix this: come out in utter, overwhelming droves in November, and vote during the midterm elections in such a way that the people who think this policy is fine … are GONE.

Candidates need to campaign on many issues, but perhaps none more striking than this: would you vote for someone who thinks it’s okay to put children in cages? Or would you prefer to vote for someone who thinks it’s awful, and inhumane, and inhuman, to put children in cages?

Children in cages.

In cages.

June 7, 2018 Posted by | civil rights, current events, government, news, politics | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

I’ll Take “Things Bestowed On Goats By Deities” For 500, Alex

Disclaimers:

First, I am trying not to turn this blog into a Presidential-candidate-critique-of-the-week.

Second, I have already blogged a couple of times about the wisdom of keeping children largely away from the political limelight, especially as regards political campaigning and advertising … so I am trying not to be repetitive in this subject area.

Third, I am trying not to generalize about the personal and professional qualities of the ever-expanding group of robber barons who believe that having run a business (sometimes into the ground) remotely qualifies them to run our federal government.

That said …

Today I go for the trifecta.

 

From The Guardian newspaper:

Carly Fiorina has been accused of “ambushing” a group of children, after she ushered pre-schoolers, who were on a field trip to a botanical garden, into an anti-abortion rally in Des Moines.

On Wednesday, the former Hewlett-Packard chief executive embarked on a day of campaigning across Iowa, in an attempt to boost her ailing presidential campaign.

The alleged ambush occurred when Fiorina hosted a “right to life” forum at the Greater Des Moines botanical garden. Entering the rally, before a crowd of about 60 people, she directed around 15 young children towards a makeshift stage.

The problem, one parent said, was that the children’s parents had not given Fiorina permission to have their children sit with her – in front of a huge banner bearing the image of an unborn foetus – while she talked about harvesting organs from aborted babies.

The kids went there to see the plants,” said Chris Beck, the father of four-year-old Chatham, one of the children Fiorina appeared with. “She ambushed my son’s field trip.”

Beck, who lives in Ankeny, north of Des Moines, said he was not asked if Fiorina could interact with the children, or whether she could take them into her rally. He said the first he knew of it was when his childcare provider told him the children had encountered the candidate at the botanical garden.

Taking them into a pro-life/abortion discussion [was] very poor taste and judgment,” Beck said. “I would not want my four-year-old going to that forum – he can’t fully comprehend that stuff. He likes dinosaurs, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Transformers.”

During the rally an anti-abortion activist, carrying a scale model of four-month-old foetus, joined Fiorina at the front of the room.

This is the face of abortion,” the activist told the crowd as Fiorina looked on. The foetus model was sucking its thumb.

In answer to a detailed series of questions from the Guardian, a Fiorina spokeswoman said in an emailed statement: “We were happy that these children chose to come to Carly’s event with their adult supervisor.”

 

Where to begin?

Teachers who lead field trips know that they have to be prepared for lots of eventualities that may not be predictable enough to be included on a permission slip letter to parents. Having a national political figure poach your students? I don’t think that should be one of those eventualities.

So I don’t blame the teachers for losing control of their charges, not one bit. I’d like to think that in their shoes, I’d have squawked pretty loudly before that event really got rolling, and would have demanded to have them back please pronto … I’d like to think this, but I’ve never been in that exact circumstance so I really don’t know how I’d react.

But who are these sociopaths that are running for office, or running their campaigns?

Who is this person who thinks it’s a great idea to grab a group of kids – any ol’ group of kids – hey, maybe that group of kids over there! – in order to make his or her campaign event look nice?

 

When I was in elementary school, which admittedly was in a much more innocent era, I replied happily to an invitation to come over to a friend’s house for supper one Friday evening. By the time the supper was over, it had turned into a progressive dinner (yep, we all got into cars and vans and went from house to house) which ended up at someone’s church somewhere, and, well, honest to God, we were listening to Scripture and singing hymns.

I did get home safely that night, after all was said and preached and done. I stayed friends with the classmate who had invited me, although I think it may be miraculous that my parents didn’t string up his parents by their thumbs.

But that night, I remember periodically thinking, “I don’t know some of these people, I’m not interested in what that guy’s talking about, I’m not sure what I’m doing here, and I’m not even sure where ‘here’ is.” Maybe I’d misread the invitation.

Couldn’t have been too different from any pre-school-age thoughts that may have been thought by those Iowa children, though.

I do know what I would have said to any available Fiorina campaign staffer afterward, or ideally Fiorina herself, if I were the pre-school teacher whose class was kidnapped in public for the sake of a campaign event about a topic (and featuring a wall-hanging) that was entirely inappropriate for pre-schoolers.

Good God, woman. Have you not even a fraction of the sense God gave a goat?

Or are you so driven by optics and the wishes of rich campaign donors that you will do anything, say anything, use anything to drive your point home?

Or worse, both?

Give me my students back, and do not ever poison my eyesight with your presence again, you pathetic, sociopathic jackwagon.

And oh yes … by the way … my lawyers cannot WAIT to be in touch with your lawyers.

These people.

January 22, 2016 Posted by | current events, Famous Persons, news, teachers | , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment